Category Archives: games

Board Game Night – First of 2016!

For our first Board Game Night of 2016 – in our brand new space, we’re breaking with tradition and featuring three new games for our next meetup!

The three games we’ve selected are all Spiel de Jahres winners and are great gateway games for those interested in modern or european style board games.

As they’ve each been previously featured on Geek & Sundry’s TableTop with Wil Wheaton, you can watch episodes in advance to see how the games are played and just how fun they are!

Of course as usual, you can still come along with any board or card game of your own you want to play with others.

 

So join us to play games on Friday 5th of February from 6:30pm in Tog’s new home in 22 Blackpitts, Dublin 8

 

Carcassonne – Spiel des Jahres Winner 2001 (TableTop – Season 2, Episode 17)

 

 

Alhambra – Spiel des Jahres Winner 2003 (TableTop – Season 1, Episode 17)

 

Board Game Night – First of 2016!

Ticket to ride – Spiel des Jahres Winner 2004 (TableTop – Season 1, Episode 4)

 

Board Game Night – First of 2016!

 

Board Game Night: Small World

Its that time again, first friday of the month! Board Game Night!

This Friday 2nd October starting from 6:3o pm the games we’ll be playing are Small World and Small World: UndergroundThis’ll be a family-friendly event, with the games recommended for ages 10 and above.

In Small World, players vie for conquest and control of a world that is simply too small to accommodate them all.

Designed by Philippe Keyaerts as a fantasy follow-up to his award-winning Vinci™, Small World is inhabited by a zany cast of characters such as dwarves, wizards, amazons, giants, orcs and even humans; who use their troops to occupy territory and conquer adjacent lands in order to push the other races off the face of the earth.

Picking the right combination from the 14 different fantasy races and 20 unique special powers, players rush to expand their empires – often at the expense of weaker neighbors. Yet they must also know when to push their own over-extended civilization into decline and ride a new one to victory!

 

 

Board Game Night

 

As many of you may be aware, we’ve been thinking long and hard about running game nights in Tog for a while now. You may have even played a few games with us at one of our open socials, but finally the stars have aligned and we’re now running a regular Board Game Night on the first Friday of the month 6:30 to 10:30pm starting from THIS FRIDAY, 4th September.

The basic concept of Board Game Night is that once per month a game is selected as the main focus of the night, and we’ll try to get a few copies of the game (when possible) so that everyone that comes can play and enjoy that game. It wont always be possible to have multiple copies, so we will have other similarly themed games going on simultaneously when that’s not possible.

It’s free and open to everyone, so just come down and play some games!

 

For our first night, we’re kicking off with Splendor as our main game of choice. We will of course have others available including Small World, Ticket to Ride, Boss Monster and others should we get a big group enough together.

Splendor is a game of chip-collecting and card development. Players are merchants of the Renaissance trying to buy gem mines, means of transportation, shops—all in order to acquire the most prestige points. If you’re wealthy enough, you might even receive a visit from a noble at some point, which of course will further increase your prestige.” BoardGameGeek

 

Lost Artwork Found!

One of our members Marie made a beautiful painting of Lightning from Final Fantasy XIII.  Sadly when Marie moved away from Philly to pursue her programming career her painting got lost in the abyss that is the Hive76 utility closet.  Luckily her painting resurface and is now on display for everyone to appreciate.

Thank you Marie, we miss you!

June 28th: NES Cartridge Hacking – Super Mario Clouds


On ~*June 28th*~ we’ll be hosting a new class on hacking NES cartridges for art and various related shenanigans. Cory Arcangel’s Super Mario Clouds is a well known work of digital art where a Nintendo game cartridge was modified to just show the clouds in the game. He also happened to release some instructions on how to reproduce his leet hax! In this workshop, we’ll be creating Super Mario Clouds from old NES cartridges, bringing modern art to your living room without having to splurge at Art Basel. Some basic soldering, desoldering, and programming will also be covered as a bonus since that’s how old NES cartridges are hacked.

Limited to 12 spots and includes your very own old Super Mario cartridge.

This class will be taught by NYC Resistor member David Huerta and Jon Dahan, who crafted this workshop after his experience re-creating it at the Metropolitan Art Museum’s Media Lab. Sign up on Eventbrite.

Busy Weekend! Hacking, Games, 3D Printing, Con!

Whoa! Super busy weekend at Milwaukee Makerspace!

There’s a DC414 Meeting on Friday April 4th, 2014 at 7pm, but don’t stay up all night hacking away on things, because there’s more fun on Saturday.

On Saturday April 5th, 2014 from 11am to 6pm is Table Top Board Game Day! Bring your friends and your games!

Saturday is also the Milwaukee 3D Printing Meetup at 1pm.

But Wait! There’s More!

This one’s for members only, but we’ll be running a Makerspace Monthly Orientation Class on Saturday at 10am. If you’re a new member, please attend!

And if the space is too crowded for you, head over to KappaKon/Concinnity 14 happening on the 3rd floor of the Milwaukee School of Engineering’s Student Center.

The DC414 Meeting, Table Top Board Game Day, and Milwaukee 3D Printing Meetup are all free and open to the public, so come hang out at Milwaukee Makerspace with us!

Real–Life Redstone Lamp Replica Controlled by a Raspberry Pi

Early in my gameplay in Minecraft I began making redstone contraptions. For those that don’t know Minecraft, you can use resources in the game to make analog electronics. People have extended this feature to build entire working computers all in redstone logic in Minecraft.

Redstone_Lamp_(Active)

Redstone Lamp (Active)

I only used redstone to make traps and novel machines, but the strong connection between redstone and electronics led me to imagine extending these machines out into the real world. I figured the easiest thing to make was the Redstone Lamp, pictured to the right. The redstone lamp is a block that will provide light when powered. My real life replica redstone lamp does the same thing. It lights up when a redstone lamp ingame is lit up. Here is a video of how it works:

I’ll describe how I got to a working replica in a few stages.

Software

I am not the best getting started with software projects, so I enlisted the help of Vince who was hanging out a bunch at Hive76. We made a quick prototype with a python Minecraft client called pyCraft, an Arduino, and transistor, and a papercraft redstone lamp. You can see that first success here.

While I worked on the physical stuff, Vince moved away and Kyle Yankanich stepped in to help me finalize some stuff. PyCraft connects to any server as a simple chat client, in our case as the user LAMPBOT. Kyle wrote a plugin for pyCraft that listens for a whisper of “on” or “off” and sets pin 16 on the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO high or low respectively. You can download my fork of pyCraft here with Kyle’s plugin and my shell script to start the client. I set my home server to Offline mode so that I wouldn’t need to purchase another Minecraft account.

Hardware

redstone lamp replica

Redstone lamp replica

For the replica, I did my best to turn pixels into straight lines. I designed a laser-cuttable box in six parts with finger joints on the edges. I used 16 finger joints because the a block is 16 pixels wide. The material is MDF with a zebra wood veneer laminated on top. I laser cut six sides and glued all but one together. I acquired some amber cathedral glass from Warner Stained Glass, cut, and glued it in place with silicone adhesive. The RPi is attached to a MDF board sitting diagonally in the cube. The LEDs were torn from inside a failbot and glued around the RPi to light up the inside as much as possible.

In order to turn the LEDs on and off, we use the signal from the RPi GPIO to control an NPN transistor and turn the lights on and off. There is a fritzing wiring diagram of the electronics here. On the NPN transistor, the Collector is the negative lead from the LEDs, the Base is connected to a 100KΩ resistor and then pin 16, and the Emitter goes to the ground on the LED power supply.

There’s no room for a power regulator, so there are two power sources and ethernet running through a hole in the back.

Ingame Stuff

Ingame redstone

ingame redstone

To trigger the lamp, command blocks are used ingame as you can see to the left. When a lever is thrown powering a specific redstone lamp, we also power a command block that sends the server command:
/tell LAMPBOT on
We also send the inverted signal to a different command block that outputs:
/tell LAMPBOT off
This can be used on any server with no mods. You would need a Minecraft account for the lamp so you don’t expose your server to cracked clients. The server this was designed for runs Minecraft 1.6.4 now, but in 1.7.2 the /testforblock command and a clock could also trigger the lamp.

 

 

I really hope you take what we have done here and continue to connect your Minecraft creations to the real world. Enjoy!

1 Pixel video game; component-driven design

It didn’t take me and Robert long to find an RGB LED pushbutton. I composed a short part number using the NKK data sheet and found a KP0215ASBKG03RGB-2SJB. I made a simple perf board shield with the proper resistors for my Arduino Mega 1280 and re-learned Arduino to light it up.

Gaussian curves from https://www.desmos.com/calculator/zkmpvehya3
Gaussian curves from https://www.desmos.com/calculator/zkmpvehya3

When I wanted to smoothly fade between all the available RGB colors, I couldn’t find a good solution. So I made my own using Gaussian curves. Here is a picture and link to the online graphic calculator desmos that was very helpful visualizing the LED levels.
There is more:

I also used the online Arduino IDE Codebender.cc to program the Arduino from a few different computers. It all runs off a chrome or firefox extension. I have embedded the code below. You can upload it to you Arduino right from this window.

I eventually got the RGB LED fading really well as you can see in this Vine:

After this success, I came up for the idea of the game with Brendan. I then coded a simple color matching game. In void setup() it flashes some colors, displays some ASCII art over serial and picks and displays a color. If you don’t touch it, the program goes into Demo Mode and just rotates pretty colors. If you press the button, the colors slowly cycle. You let go when you think it matches the color you remember, and then judges your guess. The video below shows the whole process and some design:

This project was very interesting to do. Every decision was made as needed. I went from finding the component, getting it, building something, making it to display some fun, imagining a game around that fun, coding it, to enjoying the game in about a week of fixation. I wish you could all play with this simple device, but only the few that come to Hive76 open house on any Wednesday night will play it. Come play the 1 pixel video game!

Retro Gaming & Computing Night 2013

It’s that time of year again! Retro Game and Computing Night 2013 is upon us. We are allowing all games and systems released pre-2000.

There will be all kinds of systems and games, SNES, SEGA, NES, GameBoy, Atari, as well as Amigas and other computers.  We may even have a LAN setup for old school games like Duke Nukem 3D and Starcraft.  We will also have the grill going.  Feel free to bring your own systems and/or games and food to share.

Please come join us, play some games, meet new people and see our new space.  Also, remember your donations will help us continue to do events like these.

July 6, 2013 6pm-2am
414 Stevens Ave.
Huntsville, AL 35801

OregonTrail_2013