Monthly Archives: May 2014

NYC Resistor Interactive Show

Come the NYC Resistor Interactive Show on June 7th and see Max Henstell’s “Beauty is in the Eye of the Bulb-Holder,” a 4-foot chandelier with 150 bulbs. All lights are individually addressed and programmed. You are invited to swing from it at our party! No you’re not.


The event usually sells out so BUY TICKETS while they last!

NYC Resistor Interactive Show
@NYC Resistor
Saturday June 7th @ 8:00
87 Third Avenue between Dean & Bergen in BROOKLYN!!!
$15 

A simple Touch Controller for resistive touch panels

(Hier gehts zur deutschen Version) Flipdot member [typ.o] writes: There are more and more affordable TFT displays for Raspberry Pi coming with a resistive touch panel like this from german cheapo - supplier Pollin. I don't wanted to waste a USB connector for the touch input and also I'm planning to use the display with Python in text mode. Because I couldn't find a driver for this usecase I decided to do my own stuff.



Original touch controller with USB to be replaced.





Here you have touch.zip, containing the BASCOM source for the Attiny85, corresponding HEX file, quick and dirty Python test program and lcd.py module containing some VT100 shortcuts. The Attiny is set to 8 Mhz internal RC clock and brownout detection for 2,7 V. It runs nicely with the 3V3 supply of the Pi and therefore doesn't need a level shifter.



Final touch controller on perfboard.

The controller in the first step connects the X-resistor-plane to VCC and GND using port b3 and b1 and then measures the voltage at one terminal of the Y-plane. This A/D-input also is connected to VCC via an internal pullup resistor to acieve a full scale reading if no touch (i.e. no connection between X and Y plane). Afterwards X and Y is swapped and treated accordingly. The controller sends the x,y coordinate as raw A/D-converter values. Calibration and calculation of touched character position is done by the Python script. If you touch the surface of the panel, there will be a "503,220" on the serial line for example. If you remove your finger, the controller will transmit the text "RELEASE". That'sall. KISS.
"A simple Touch Controller for resistive touch panels" vollständig lesen

A simple Touch Controller for resistive touch panels

(Hier gehts zur deutschen Version) Flipdot member [typ.o] writes: There are more and more affordable TFT displays for Raspberry Pi coming with a resistive touch panel like this from german cheapo - supplier Pollin. I don't wanted to waste a USB connector for the touch input and also I'm planning to use the display with Python in text mode. Because I couldn't find a driver for this usecase I decided to do my own stuff.



Original touch controller with USB to be replaced.









A simple Touch Controller for resistive touch panels

Here you have touch.zip, containing the BASCOM source for the Attiny85, corresponding HEX file, quick and dirty Python test program and lcd.py module containing some VT100 shortcuts. The Attiny is set to 8 Mhz internal RC clock and brownout detection for 2,7 V. It runs nicely with the 3V3 supply of the Pi and therefore doesn't need a level shifter.

A simple Touch Controller for resistive touch panels

Final touch controller on perfboard.

The controller in the first step connects the X-resistor-plane to VCC and GND using port b3 and b1 and then measures the voltage at one terminal of the Y-plane. This A/D-input also is connected to VCC via an internal pullup resistor to acieve a full scale reading if no touch (i.e. no connection between X and Y plane). Afterwards X and Y is swapped and treated accordingly. The controller sends the x,y coordinate as raw A/D-converter values. Calibration and calculation of touched character position is done by the Python script. If you touch the surface of the panel, there will be a "503,220" on the serial line for example. If you remove your finger, the controller will transmit the text "RELEASE". That'sall. KISS.
"A simple Touch Controller for resistive touch panels" vollständig lesen

3D Printer Back up and Running:

In time for this week’s Open Craft night, we have been working hard to fix the problems we had with our 3D printer and we got it working last night. We were able to print out some test parts and it’s open for business again!

3D Printer Back up and Running:

We also got another new toy tool in the form of a genuine flamethrower which we tested out and worked magnificently.

Additionally, we have another exciting tool that has been brought to the space on loan from Chester: a genuine Craftsman 10″ radial arm saw. We will be working on oiling it up and setting it up and will post pics of its awesomeness all in due time.

I also intend to finally set up that giant 2D Plotter this weekend and really put it to the test and print out some blueprints.

All in all there’s some exciting things happening in the shop. Check out the Facebook for the flamethrower test video 3D Printer Back up and Running:

Keep calm and hack on,

-MB

Made at shackspace: qwood – the wooden quad-copter frame

shackspace resident hacker Robert is at it again. This time around he’s built a new frame for this quad-copter.
In the past he’s used everything from aluminium, carbon fiber to 3D-printed parts to build his copters and had mixed results (one 3D-printed copter melted in the summer heat while stored in his car).

Now he went with an all-new plywood design. The whole thing only weighs in at 167 gramms and – despite being assembled without a single drop of glue – is very sturdy.

Made at shackspace: qwood – the wooden quad-copter frame

DevboardAholics Anonymous Night

Do you have more devboards than you have projects? Is the teetering pile of boards threatening to topple and crush a household pet? Do you have a google alert for “arduino compatible” on kickstarter? Can you use boards running “blink” instead of christmas lights? Are the sketchy radio dev boards heating your house, and cooking eggs in their shell if you put them on the workbench?

It might be time to admit that you have a problem – and then celebrate that problem with the rest of us!

Bring your boards down for a collaborative show and tell.

What: Showing off and chatting about different developer boards
Where:  VHS (270 east 1st http://vancouver.hackspace.ca/wp/about/ )
When: June 23rd, 2014. 7:30PM.
Why: we need a reason?.
Who: Anyone with or interested in different devboards
Cost: Nothing upfront, but you know in a moment of weakness, you’ll probably end up buying more…

 

On-line Videos for the Curious Hacker

06/02/2014 20:00
06/02/2014 22:00
06/02/2014 20:00
06/02/2014 22:00

Have you found a nice video on-line (e.g.: in youtube) that any hacker would love to watch?

Are there any great hacking videos in your language (e.g.: Japanese)or your field (e.g.: chemistry) that you would like to introduce to people from different cultures or backgrounds?

If your answer is yes to any of the questions above, then I suggest showing up to this event.

The flow of the event will be pretty simple. Participants will have the chance to introduce their favourite videos in turn.

Instructors: 
Daniel
Pricing
Member Price: 
0
Non-Member Price: 
1000

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