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Dremel Build Day – Sat. Aug 2, 2014 11am-4pm

Maui Makers presents “Dremel Build Day”   with sponsorship from Instructables.com
(for full background on sponsorship see the Instructables.com post)

When: Saturday August 2, 11am-4pm
Where: Home of Richard and Lynn Rasmussen - 3191 Baldwin Ave, Makawao Hawaii 96768
(map link http://goo.gl/maps/3hVNF )

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Who: Open to Public. Under 18 requires presence of parent or legal guardian.
Liability wavers (available on-site) must be signed to attend.
No children under 10yrs, please. And only if they are participating.

What: Learn to use Dremel rotary and multi-max tools, help us make at least 2 “instructables” documenting how-to projects with them.

The event itself is free. We will have a small quantity of materials for use. Perhaps some larger pieces available at cost. Instructables has provided us with 5 dremel  Model 4000 rotary tools and three Multi-Max MM30 Oscillating tools, along with a supply of bits (5x of the 3 sets pictured below) etc.

Dremel Build Day – Sat. Aug 2, 2014 11am-4pm

What to Bring:

  1. Your Project Ideas (and supplies – wood, plexiglas, glue, nails, etc)
  2. Your own eye protection, dust mask, and other safety gear.
  3. Your own dremel and/or other tools (while we have some, more is more!) MARK YOUR OWN EQUIPMENT!! write your name on it so it leaves with you.
  4. Sack lunch, beverage, and something to share if you like.
  5. Digital Camera/Video/laptop/smartphone – to help document the projects

(Note Instructables has apps for both IOS and Android
What Kind of Dremel Project?
Great question.  Most projects might use a Dremel for only a small task (cutting bolts, sanding finish, etc) This would be fine for practice and maybe an intro-to-dremel instructable. Other projects might feature the tools – carving/engraving wood/acrylic sculptures, trimming pet’s nails.

Dremel has a video showing some quick ideas: cut metal pipe, wire shelving, nails; remove grout, drill/shape/sand wood

Why: we have been given over $1000 worth of Dremel tools for our makerspace, on the condition that we host a build night (day), give a 15minute safety presentation, and create at least two “instructables” (text/pics/video how to for the website http://www.instructables.com ) Again, the background on their sponsorship is on their blog page: http://www.instructables.com/community/July-2014-Build-Night-with-Dremel/

If we do a good job with this project & make some cool instructables (extra points for blog posts), Instructables will keep us on the list for more supplies and tools.

Please come out and help! If you don’t have a project in mind, come help document.

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Unity Community Center Workshop

Last year we the Children’s Discovery Museum’s education coordinator (Bethany Thomas) invited us to do a workshop with their Maker Camp. This year we were invited back to have more maker related fun with the wonderful kids at the Unity Community Center. Seven of our Makerspace Urbana volunteers were able to attend and we set up 3 different maker activity  stations for the kids.  One station was our classic soldering workshop!

Soldering is Easy! And kids pick it up really quick.

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This girl quickly became an excellent soldering teacher after finishing her own blinky badge.

Another was Led/Throwy/Origami.

Unity Community Center Workshop

Light up origami time!

The new workshop station we were able to provide this time was sewing custom plush dolls! Huge thanks to Judy Lee from the Champaign-Urbana Community Fab Lab for helping teach and put this workshop station together.

Unity Community Center Workshop

The kids got to cut out the patterns they created.

Unity Community Center Workshop

Learned to sew and stitch their pieces together.

Unity Community Center Workshop

And ended up with some amazing creations!

Thanks to the all the awesome kids who made this event a memorable one for all of us.

Full photo album here.

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Hacker Sunday

07/27/2014 15:30
07/27/2014 21:30
07/27/2014 15:30
07/27/2014 21:30
Event Type: 
Workshop

Lets do something!
I will teach Arduino to anyone who wants to learn. I will give any advice I can.
Want to try out the laser cutter? I will be there to help you out.
Need a project?
Let's reorganize the room a bit and start work on the vending machines. We have lots of stuff to do.

Instructors: 
MRE
Pricing
Non-Member Price: 
1000
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Hacker Saturday

07/26/2014 13:30
07/26/2014 19:30
07/26/2014 13:30
07/26/2014 19:30
Event Type: 
Project

Lets do something!
I will teach Arduino to anyone who wants to learn. I will give any advice I can.
Want to try out the laser cutter? I will be there to help you out.
Need a project?
Let's reorganize the room a bit and start work on the vending machines. We have lots of stuff to do.

Instructors: 
MRE
Pricing
Non-Member Price: 
1000

Dee Conlon’s workshop on Wearable Electronics – Friday July 25

Dee will be providing a workshop on Wearable Electronics (WE) this week, specifically Wall Hangings.  Learn how to sew a NeoPixel circuit using stainless steel thread. Flora’s will be pre-programmed with a simple light show, that you can customize on your own after class.   The workshop is Friday July 25 – 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.  $50.00 covers the cost of materials – free instruction from an expert!

Workshop details on Dee’s site: http://www.deesquiltdesigns.com

Youtube video example of a quilt: Wearables Quilt

Venue:
Island Sign
355 Hukilike St, #117
Kahului, Maui

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littleBits Projects

Back in June we announced some Instructables Build Nights featuring littleBits and the new Arduino at Heart modules. We had a lot of members play with the ‘Bits during the last six weeks, and we’re still waiting for Steve to publish the detailed instructions on his “littleBits-powered Vomit-Inducing Machine”, but for now we’ll have to make do with the littleBits Arduino Annoying Machine that Eric and his son built.

I also got in on the action, with two Instructables that (sort of) go together; littleBits Serial Data and littleBits Serial Controller. All of our projects make use of the Arduino module, which add some great programming functions to the littleBits world.

If you didn’t get a chance to play with the ‘Bits yet, we will have four littleBits Deluxe Kits and a bunch of Arduino modules at the space to experiment with. They should be treated like a LEGO set; build something, then take it apart. Hopefully having some fun and learning something new along the way.

(Big Thanks to Instructables and littleBits for providing the kits to us!)

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Más cosas que comunicar…

El labo les hace llegar algunos datos para que tengan presentes:

El viernes 26 y sábado 2 regresa el taller de Circuit Bending del gran Norman Bates (aka Cristian Martinez).

Más cosas que comunicar…

Traé los juguetes sonoros que tu sobrino ya dejó de usar, tus walkie talkie de la infancia, la radio de bolsillo con la que escuchás los partidos o lo que se te ocurra y descubrí todos los sonidos ocultos que tienen adentro!
No hace falta experiencia previa, pero si alguna vez bendeaste algo ya y ahora querés algo más avanzado también te vamos a ayudar.


Sábados 26 de julio y 2 de agosto. De 11 a 14:30
Anchorena 632
Costo: $300, incluye componentes y materiales.
Más info a tallerbates@gmail.com

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Avisamos también el que taller de experimentación en video analógico de Javier Plano reprogramó su inicio al 2 de agosto.  Toda la data está ACÁ (o más abajo en este mismo blog si no te da fiaca scrollear un toque…)

Más cosas que comunicar…

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Finalmente les avisamos que los MARTES DE ONDA entran en receso invernal desde hoy. Regresamos el 12 de agosto y no paramos hasta el 25 de noviembre!

Más cosas que comunicar…

Eso es todo por ahora. Seguimos en contacto por acá o por nuestra página de FACEBOOK. Saludos!


Más cosas que comunicar…
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Do you like candy? I like candy.

Here’s a very brief overview of the thought process for building something to amuse and frighten your neighbours.

I originally wrote this up on May 31st and posted it elsewhere, but I thought I’d give the VHS regulars time to explore it on their own before I ruined the surprise.

Some of the readers may recognise this big red button o’ fun:

When somebody holds it, it starts up an air raid siren that can get really loud. Unfortunately, it spins up very slowly, so people let off as soon as they figure out what the button does. That results in one tiny little blip of the siren, barely enough to bother anyone. That’s no good at all!

 

So for this build, I didn’t want to spend very long at it, and attempted to do everything very roughly and as quickly as possible. I found all of the appropriate components kicking around, and designed around those.

Here’s what I came up with:

Do you like candy? I like candy.

 

I found a transformer with outputs that measure at about 12VAC. 10:1 winding ratio, I guess. After rectification and smoothing, it’s a little over 18VDC. On the right side, I used an ALA2F12, a 12V relay. The transistor is a 2N3604, just a very generic NPN BJT because this application doesn’t require anything special.

The original button was just the AC line voltage to the fuse, then through the switch to the load. Very simple.

 

Okay. Starting from the left:

  • Transformer outputs at 12 volts or so,
  • through the half-wave rectifier diode (1N4007 I think) – results in 12 * root 2, about 18V,
  • big filtering capacitor (200v, 820uF),
  • 1MΩ bleeder resistor so the system doesn’t hold charge indefinitely,
  • original switch (connected to the big red button),
  • 100Ω resistor(to prevent sparks)
  • into timing cap (160v, 220uF) – charges to full very quickly,
  • another bleeder resistor,
  • Rb controlling current going into the transistor’s base (more on this later),
  • BJT  base.
  • At the top: resistor controlling going into the relay coil,
  • relay coil,
  • BJT collector going to ground.

 

Because I’m abusing a 12V relay by driving it with 18V, I had to compensate for that a little. According to the data sheet, the coil is nominally 272Ω, taking 43mA of current. Ignoring the transistor’s collector-emitter voltage (probably ~0.2V): 18v / 43mA – 272Ω = 146Ω. So I tossed a 150Ω resistor in series with the coil, and it seems to work.

 

For the base of the transistor, this resistor (along with the capacitor) is what controls the active time of the system. It also controls the maximum current that can conduct through the collector-emitter junction of the 3604. Typically the gain of those are in the 70-100 range, so current going into the base should be Ib = 43mA/100 = 0.43mA. Base-emitter junction is around 0.7v, so the base resistor can be figured out by 18v – 0.7v / Ib when the base cap is fully charged. Overdrive Ib to 1mA to ensure max-on, so I used 18kΩ.

I tested everything to check timing issues, overheating, etc., and it works well. The relay gets latched for about 7 seconds, which is perfect. If I cared about being more precise with that, or wanted to change the timing values, it’s pretty simple to treat that portion as an RC circuit and tweak the resistor or capacitor values.

So I built it.

Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy. Do you like candy? I like candy.

Perfect! Start to finish, including laser cutting, about seven hours. Not counting the abortive first attempt last week.

So before, when newcomers pressed the button, there was only a very short blip of the air raid siren. Now, the thing latched for a good seven seconds. And it gets very loud in that time.

 

The real purpose of this hack (and doing a write-up) is to encourage more members to go out and hack something! I haven’t seen anything really cool in a while.

 

Enjoy!

Jarrett